Teaching is about caring …

Standard

There are many caring and absolutely respected jobs in this world. One profession I utterly respect is that of Nurses and Support workers who in my opinion, are wonderful, wonderful people. I also genuinely think up there with those caring, great jobs, has to be teaching.

I honestly believe the vital quality, the very essence of a good or great teacher is that they genuinely care. About lots of things.

You have to care about your children as people and individuals, and not just how they’ll get the grades you want or need them to achieve by certain days or the end of the year. You have to care about them as young people, young learners who are learning so much about the world every minute. Let’s face it, we live in a busy, rapidly changing world which moves frantically forward in society, technologies, science as each single day passes. And god bless them, by the time of those teen years there’s a ton else going on in their lives which can mean school is their only safe or happy refuge. Or a very unhappy place. Or a disinterest. What a loss. To lose interest in learning.

You have to care about helping them to learn, to help them learn to learn and to learn about themselves too. You have to care about understanding where they  are coming from sometimes and what’s happening in their lives, perhaps difficult circumstances at home which might be influencing them. Even down to kindergarteners, never mind teenagers or pre teens. If one of my student’s parents is away for work often or just on certain days/ periods of time, I need to support that child. If they have a new brother or sister, there’s careful consideration there necessary from the eyes of the teacher to help them with that. Children and young learners need nuturing  and we, the teachers, who students spend half of their day with and are constant figures in their path to adulthood should nurture them. Help them in the professional and caring way we need to be to help them strive to be the best they can be.

Loving Learning! Grade 6 - Issan, Thailand, 2009

Loving Learning! Grade 6 – Issan, Thailand, 2009

You should care that you inspire your students. That they’re preparing for the tough world of work and adulthood which ultimately comes at the end of the whole timely process. whichever age you teach. Kindergarteners are just starting to learn how to make sense of a seemingly and often complex busy world in a beautifully innocent naivety that very young children have. First, second, third graders, all of them upwards are learning really complex stuff as well as facing and feeling an increasingly heavy pressure to progress, achieve and succeed – honest I’ve seen some of their work in class and it’s amazing what they’re learning and doing. They’re only like 7 or 8. Achieving wonderful things. All in a complex community of learners, involving a huge myriad of people and learning situations with;  peers, elders, youngers, teachers, family, people they meet from other schools, learners they learn from and engage with on the internet, television, the media -in fact everywhere. The work produced by middle/ high school students should be applauded.

I went to the Grade 5 exhibition a while back and was stunned at this whole array of personal projects these students had worked so hard at and done such a great job with. And each passionately following their own questions and interests to create a personal project and such amazing art, drama and musical representations to support their work. Amazing. I wondered what I had been doing in Grade 5 back in my past life  when I saw their work, and I don’t recall anything of such complexity and maturity. How much education changes, all the time, (even in my short life so far) and how a good curriculum ( I love the IB inquiry method) and good teachers can make those sometimes relentless changes to be positive ones. To be part of that evolution of teaching and learning, how amazing. From students being an empty vessel to be filled with knowledge as was such in the not so distant past, to be inspiring them to create their own path of learning and follow their own rigour and hard work in doing so, following a path that interests them. To be a learner helping a learner. Not a teacher helping a learner. Isn’t that how we should be helping our students learn in both their school work and also their understanding of learning itself, how they best learn, what they want to learn about, so they can be inspired and engaged in meaningful learning,  relevant to them, their studies and life in an intrinsically curious way?

Happy classes

Happy classes

We all experience and learn every day. In addition to caring, every good teacher should be humble. Accept that they are in fact still themselves a learner and can and will make mistakes. It’s definitely okay to make mistakes but a hundred percent better if we accept and learn from them, especially when that knowledge and growth stops us making it a second or third time in the future? In fact if we admitted to our students more often that we’ve made or do make mistakes, they’d feel much more comfortable with making mistakes themselves. Being open to the process of learning.

Who ever got long division the first time?! Seriously? Some of us still struggle with it or other concepts like percentages now as an adult. Who can remember Pythagoras Therorum clearly now all these years later? (unless you’re a maths teacher!) How many things have we had to learn in our own lives, and more importantly, just how much more do we have to learn, and will learn in our future. Embrace it, I think, for a much more open and less complex life. A healthier life.

 

I make mistakes all the time with my kids, and I feel lucky that in Kindergarten, it’s easy to accept it and let my students know a) I’ve done so and b)  know it’s okay to be wrong because ‘Miss Kielly’s just made a very silly mistake!!’ … cue a gaggle of loud giggling children, potentially actually rolling on the floor with silly laughter! But it’s important to do it wherever you work in a school and with every student. To feel safe in fact is in the knowing of safely of being able to make a mistake/s and know it’s okay, nothing bad is going to happen. School should be a safe place. Let’s encourage it more. Who wants students to be so scared of being wrong that they necessarily limit themselves. How sad.

Helping each other - Grade 5 students Issan, Thailand, 2009

Helping each other – Grade 5 students Issan, Thailand, 2009

Collaboration - Grade 5 Students, Issan - Thailand. 2009

Collaboration – Grade 5 Students, Issan – Thailand. 2009

Don’t limit yourself just because you’re an adult and supposedly know everything! Accept mistakes when you make them,  acknowledge them,  grow from them, and show your students your own personal learning curve.

Teaching is a great profession. Enjoy it! Help your students enjoy it! Listen, think, reflect, act, reflect and learn. Remember to care.

Advertisements

4 responses »

  1. Agree that caring is important – not just in teaching but in everything, everyone should have the gift of caring about the work they do – can’t imagine what it must be like for anyone to get up each day and just go through the motions.

    One comment though –

    “I make mistakes all the time with my kids, and I feel lucky that in Kindergarten, it’s easy to accept it”

    I don’t think being in Kindergarten makes it easy – what makes admitting you made a mistake easy (indeed desirable) is the culture that you as a teacher, or we as a school create. I would often tell my G5s about my mistakes and sometimes we’d talk them through – especially if i planned a lesson that totally bombed, or when i was realizing that a unit wasn’t working – it helped me and them learn. There was never any judgement – we just new that acknowledging mistakes was part of the way we did things.

    As a coordinator now i sometimes have to stand in front of 50 peers and tell them i made a mistake – i don’t mind doing it because i hope we are creating a culture in our school where there’s an understanding that we all get it wrong sometimes, and that when we do, we acknowledge it, plan better and move ahead.

    • Hi Jacqui, Thanks for reading and responding. Yes how soul destroying to get up and just go through the motions every day at a job you don’t care about or for. We are lucky to enjoy the work we do.
      Yes I really think that culture is growing at SWA, and its enjoyable to see such a healthy attitude towards learning and knowing we are all involved in helping to nurture and develop that culture. Yes I agree being in Kindergarten doesn’t necessarily make it easier to admit mistakes, but I do find it easier to admit to my 4/5 year old students than my peers. Which I need to work on. We all have things to work on. We’re all learners still.

  2. I especially like what you say about being humble. I spent two summers in language-immersion programs. Because I tested well, I was put in classes far too high for my verbal ability. The result: I felt stupid.

    I’m an adult – I have enough life experience to safely say I’m NOT stupid. But each day I’d wake up, be determined to focus as much as I could and, for the first time, understand what my teacher was trying to communicate. About 20 minutes into a lesson, I was lost. I demonstrated all sorts of attention-deficit behaviors I wouldn’t accept from my students. Never before had I drawn on my shoes :).

    The experience of feeling stupid has greatly helped me connect with my students who struggle. I can say, “Look, I know you’re struggling with this right now. You’re not dumb – you are just missing some vocabulary [or concepts]. Let’s figure out what that is and move on from there.”

    I recommend every teacher put him/herself into a learning situation where they are completely and utterly frustrated. Most of us educators were highly successful in school – we need to know what it feels like to struggle.

    Janet | expateducator.com

  3. Pingback: From Learner to Teacher | Explore. Dream. Discover.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s